Cobbler's awls

1) balls, testicles;
2) Balls!= Rubbish!, Nonsence!

Dictionary of Australian slang . 2013.

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  • cobbler's awls — I Australian Slang 1. balls, testicles; 2. Balls!= Rubbish!, Nonsence! II Cockney Rhyming Slang Balls (testicles) Go on! Kick him in the cobblers! Can also be used to express disbelief, such as Cobblers! That s not the way it is …   English dialects glossary

  • Cobbler — Cobbler(s) may refer to: A shoemaker who repairs shoes, rather than manufacturing them (see cordwainer for a discussion of the distinction). Cobbler apron, a type of apron that covers both the front and back of the body The Cobbler, a mountain… …   Wikipedia

  • cobbler — ► NOUN 1) a person whose job is mending shoes. 2) chiefly N. Amer. a fruit pie with a rich, cake like crust. 3) (cobblers) Brit. informal nonsense. [ORIGIN: originally in the sense «testicles»: from rhyming slang cobbler s awls «balls».] ● let… …   English terms dictionary

  • cobbler — n. 1 a person who mends shoes, esp. professionally. 2 an iced drink of wine etc., sugar, and lemon (sherry cobbler). 3 a a fruit pie topped with scones. b esp. US a fruit pie with a rich thick crust. 4 (in pl.) Brit. sl. nonsense. 5 Austral. & NZ …   Useful english dictionary

  • cobbler — noun 1》 a person whose job is mending shoes. 2》 an iced drink made with wine or sherry, sugar, and lemon. 3》 chiefly N. Amer. a fruit pie with a rich, cake like crust. 4》 (cobblers) Brit. informal a man s testicles. [from rhyming sl. cobbler s… …   English new terms dictionary

  • cobbler's-awl — ˈkäblə(r)z+ˌ noun (plural cobbler s awls) 1. : avocet 2. Australia : a spinebill (Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris) …   Useful english dictionary

  • awl — [OE] The Old English form, æl, came from a hypothetical Germanic base *āl , which had a probable relative in Sanskrit ārā. The compound bradawl was formed in the 19th century using the term brad ‘thin flat nail’, which came originally from Old… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • awl — [OE] The Old English form, æl, came from a hypothetical Germanic base *āl , which had a probable relative in Sanskrit ārā. The compound bradawl was formed in the 19th century using the term brad ‘thin flat nail’, which came originally from Old… …   Word origins

  • cobble — as in cobblestone [15] and cobble ‘mend’ [15] are two distinct words. The former was derived from cob ‘rounded lump’, with the diminutive suffix le. The earliest evidence of it is in the compound cobblestone, and it is not recorded on its own… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • cobble — as in cobblestone [15] and cobble ‘mend’ [15] are two distinct words. The former was derived from cob ‘rounded lump’, with the diminutive suffix le. The earliest evidence of it is in the compound cobblestone, and it is not recorded on its own… …   Word origins


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